Frequently Asked Questions

Donor conceived children are entitled to know the identity of their donor once they reach the age of 18. All donors must agree to have their identity released when any offspring turn 18, regardless of whether the donor is Australian or not.

By law, there is a limit of between 5 and 10 families (depending on which state of Australia the Genea clinic performs the treatment). This includes your own family. There is no limit to the number of children per family.

On average you will donate six samples, as well as a sample for the initial semen analysis. Genea donors are required to have two counselling appointments. The first appointment covers all aspects of becoming a donor and the second appointment is with our Genetic Counsellor to discuss the genetic testing you must undergo. You will also be booked in to see a Doctor for some tests, so you will visit the clinic about eight to nine times.

There is a shortage of Australian sperm donors as demand has significantly outstripped supply.
Sperm can be ordered from banks in the United States and Europe but it is expensive and the donors provided to Australian recipients are restricted because of the limitation of how many families can be helped by one donor.

No, there is no cost for your medical appointments, blood and urine tests and counselling sessions. We will also reimburse donors for reasonable associated expenses.